Biblioklept

Biblioklept

1. A person who steals books

Here is an example of how this word is used.
“Our Scrapbook of minutes was stolen by some biblioklept.”
— Christopher Morley

Definition and quote from dictionary.com

 

Zeugma

Zeugma
1.The use of a word to modify or govern two or more words when it is appropriate to only one of them or is
appropriate to each but in a different way, as in to wage war and peace  or On his fishing trip, he caught three trout and a cold.

Definition and examples from dictionary.com

Pseudomorph

Pseudomorph

1.An irregular or unclassifiable form.
2.A mineral having the outward appearance of another mineral that it has replaced by chemical action.
Origin:
Pseudomorph  originally applied to minerals which looked like one type of mineral but were actually composed of another. Though from Greek roots, pseudomorph  was used in German before entering English in the 1830s.Definition and origin from dictionary.com

Nice

Did you know the meaning and origin of the word “nice” didn’t always mean the same as it does today? Well, it’s true!

Here is the definition of the word nice as it is currently used:

Nice

adjective,

1.pleasing; agreeable; delightful: a nice visit.
2.amiably pleasant; kind: They are always nice to strangers.
3.characterized by, showing, or requiring great accuracy,precision, skill, tact, care, or delicacy: nice workmanship; a niceshot; a nice handling of a crisis.
4.showing or indicating very small differences; minutely accurate,as instruments: a job that requires nice measurements.
5.minute, fine, or subtle: a nice distinction.
And here is the original meaning of the word nice…

Nice

late 13c., “foolish, stupid, senseless,” from O.Fr. nice “silly, foolish,” from L. nescius “ignorant,” lit. “not-knowing,” from ne- “not” (see un-) + stem of scire “to know.” “The sense development has been extraordinary, even for an adj.” [Weekley] — from “timid” (pre-1300); to “fussy, fastidious” (late 14c.); to “dainty, delicate” (c.1400); to “precise, careful” (1500s, preserved in such terms as a nice distinction and nice and early); to “agreeable, delightful” (1769); to “kind, thoughtful” (1830). In 16c.-17c. it is often difficult to determine exactly what is meant when a writer uses this word. By 1926, it was pronounced “too great a favorite with the ladies, who have charmed out of it all its individuality and converted it into a mere diffuser of vague and mild agreeableness.”
Definitions from www.dictionary.com .